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Rowen-Ogg: Guelph's Last Shoe Manufacturers

Bonnie Durtnall 0 48 Article rating: No rating

The Rowen family was well known in Guelph for their boot and shoe store on Wyndham Street. Daniel R. Rowen (1847-1927) operated his shop at 16/18 Wyndham during the late 19th century. Lorando (Orlando) Ely Rowan (1875-1920), took over the shop from 1908-to 1909. It was in the following year that L.E. decided to go one step further and manufacture women’s, girls and children’s shoes. He joined in partnership with  experienced American shoemakers, James (John) Ogg, John J. Doherty and Thomas Dowdell to form Rowen-Ogg.

The New Idea Spreader Company: Making Manure Spreading Easier

Bonnie Durtnall 0 72 Article rating: No rating

Joseph Oppenheim (1859-1901), a schoolmaster in Maria Stein, Ohio invented  the first modern “widespreading” manure spreader. Locally, it was referred to as “Oppenheim’s new idea.” The name was adopted and the New Idea Spreader Company was born.

Oppenheim died in 1901. His wife, Maria, took charge and aided in this by her eldest son, B.C. Oppenheim, and one of the company’s original employees, and co-inventor, Henry Synck ensured the success of the company. By 1916, the New Idea Spreader had branches in eight states as well as a factory or assembly plant in Guelph.

Making Felt in Guelph: The Story of the Lancashire Felt Company

Bonnie Durtnall 0 159 Article rating: 1.0

St. Patrick's Ward (The Ward) was once the city of Guelph's industrial area. It was home to many manufacturing operations with reputations extending outside of the city's boundaries. Among them were the International Malleable Iron company (IMICO), Gilson's, WC Wood, the Guelph Stove Company, Matthews-Wells and Biltmore Hats. Yet, many companies who contributed significantly to the city's economic and social ell-being have been forgotten. Among them is the Lancashire Felt Company.

Guelph's Other Hat Companies: Fried-Grills and Jochimeck Drone

Bonnie Durtnall 0 153 Article rating: No rating
When hats are mentioned in Guelph, everyone thinks about Biltmore Hats Inc. While the position of this company and its products is important, it was not the sole producer of hats in this city. Two other companies made this product in Guelph; both have connections to Biltmore. They were Fried-Grills Hats - the predecessor to Biltmore Hats and the Jochimeck-Drone Hat Company.

No Relief From Relief: The Great Depression In Guelph

Bonnie Durtnall 0 289 Article rating: No rating

During the last few years of the 1920s, Guelphites were beginning to feel quite optimistic. After the post-war slump, the economy was turning around. Companies were hiring and workers were regaining much of what they had lost. Then, on October 29, 1929, came the crash plunging employers and employees alike into a new economic reality.

One year later, 400,000 Canadians were out of work. Wages were cut and those employed had to live on less pay. Businesses retrenched and the labour movement was brought to a temporary standstill. All levels of Government, attempted to curtail the downward spiral. They instituted various Relief Programs, including Relief Camps, Relief Settlements, Relief Gangs and Relief distribution. Truly, during the 1930s, there was no relief from Relief.

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The New Idea Spreader Company: Making Manure Spreading Easier

Joseph Oppenheim (1859-1901), a schoolmaster in Maria Stein, Ohio invented  the first modern “widespreading” manure spreader. Locally, it was referred to as “Oppenheim’s new idea.” The name was adopted and the New Idea Spreader Company was born.

Oppenheim died in 1901. His wife, Maria, took charge and aided in this by her eldest son, B.C. Oppenheim, and one of the company’s original employees, and co-inventor, Henry Synck ensured the success of the company. By 1916, the New Idea Spreader had branches in eight states as well as a factory or assembly plant in Guelph.

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Rowen-Ogg: Guelph's Last Shoe Manufacturers

The Rowen family was well known in Guelph for their boot and shoe store on Wyndham Street. Daniel R. Rowen (1847-1927) operated his shop at 16/18 Wyndham during the late 19th century. Lorando (Orlando) Ely Rowan (1875-1920), took over the shop from 1908-to 1909. It was in the following year that L.E. decided to go one step further and manufacture women’s, girls and children’s shoes. He joined in partnership with  experienced American shoemakers, James (John) Ogg, John J. Doherty and Thomas Dowdell to form Rowen-Ogg.

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