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From Coffin To Casket: Early Burial Box Makers And Casket Manufacturers

Bonnie Durtnall 0 974 Article rating: No rating
When it comes to burial, the choices have always varied. This is also true with the type of vessels chosen to hold the remains of the deceased. Cultural norms and personal preferences play a significant role in selecting the right container. In North America, two common types used for ground burials are coffins and caskets. Although sometimes used interchangeably, they differ in shape and perception.

In Guelph, coffin makers tended to be cabinet makers or carpenters during the early to late 19th century. Later, as funeral directors emerged, caskets became the popular term for burial boxes. Mechanization also came into play together. The result was casket making companies such as the (New) Dominion Casket Company and the Guelph Casket Works.

The Cartledge Knitting Mill: Training Ground for Joseph S. Cartledge, Founder of Guelph Elastic Hosiery

Bonnie Durtnall 0 874 Article rating: 4.0
Guelph has been home to various textile factories. Carter’s Royal Knitting Company, Zephyr Looms and Cartledge’s Knitting Company are a few examples. The Cartledge Knitting Company appeared at about the same time as Carter’s. It, too, was a cottage industry, located in the back of what was one of the oldest houses when it was torn down in 1956. The actual shop behind 27 Quebec Street was, unlike Carter’s a family-operated industry. John (Joseph) Cartledge was to provide the basic training and introduce the skills to his son, Joseph S. Cartledge that was to give him what he needed to take the next step - founding his own business:  the specialized and unique Guelph Elastic Hosiery

Samuel Carter And The Royal Knitting Company

Bonnie Durtnall 0 942 Article rating: No rating
Samuel Carter (1860 – 1944) arrived in Guelph in 1882 after spending about a year-and-a-half in Philadelphia. He had been born in Ruddington in Nottinghamshire, England, a village where the main industry was hosiery. After a brief time boarding in a hotel, he settled on a cottage on 60 Manitoba Street in St. Patrick’s Ward joining forces with a partner whose name may have been Greenside or Grenside. This stone building was to act as a small-scale hosiery knitting mill from 1883 until around 1894/95. This was the start of what was to become known as the Royal Knitting Company.

Carriages And Wagons: From Minor Repair Work To Manufacturing

Bonnie Durtnall 0 927 Article rating: No rating
Along with Blacksmiths, carriage and wagon makers and repairers played a significant role in the development of Ontario, physically and economically. Until the arrival of first the railway and then the automobile, wagons and carriages were the main mode of transportation. They not only carried people from one point to another, they also conveyed various types of supplies and goods, including those for retailers. Until the railway made shipping goods faster and more practical, wagons fulfilled this essential role in any community, including Guelph. T

o service this need, Guelph not only had blacksmiths and wainwrights but also carriage/wagon manufacturers.

JB Armstrong And Family: From Carriages to Automobiles

Bonnie Durtnall 0 812 Article rating: No rating

Carriages were the main form of transport for individuals and businesses alike in Guelph during the 1800s. Blacksmiths were responsible for the horses that pulled them. They also made repairs to the carriages, wagons and carts used for carting goods and conveying people in, around and out of Guelph. Among them, the Sallows family remains the most recognized for their work in this trade. They had a large shop at the corner of Gordon.

However, blacksmiths did not make carriages. In Guelph, this trade fell to several individuals. Those who had shops included Charles H. Thain – who is better known for his agricultural equipment and Robert Anderson. However, the most prominent and successful Guelphite in this competitive trade was J. B. Armstrong, son of Robert Armstrong.

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The New Idea Spreader Company: Making Manure Spreading Easier

Joseph Oppenheim (1859-1901), a schoolmaster in Maria Stein, Ohio invented  the first modern “widespreading” manure spreader. Locally, it was referred to as “Oppenheim’s new idea.” The name was adopted and the New Idea Spreader Company was born.

Oppenheim died in 1901. His wife, Maria, took charge and aided in this by her eldest son, B.C. Oppenheim, and one of the company’s original employees, and co-inventor, Henry Synck ensured the success of the company. By 1916, the New Idea Spreader had branches in eight states as well as a factory or assembly plant in Guelph.

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Rowen-Ogg: Guelph's Last Shoe Manufacturers

The Rowen family was well known in Guelph for their boot and shoe store on Wyndham Street. Daniel R. Rowen (1847-1927) operated his shop at 16/18 Wyndham during the late 19th century. Lorando (Orlando) Ely Rowan (1875-1920), took over the shop from 1908-to 1909. It was in the following year that L.E. decided to go one step further and manufacture women’s, girls and children’s shoes. He joined in partnership with  experienced American shoemakers, James (John) Ogg, John J. Doherty and Thomas Dowdell to form Rowen-Ogg.

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