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The Working Class In Winter

Tobogganing And Sleighing

Bonnie Durtnall 0 1416 Article rating: 4.5

In winter, children hit the hills with sleighs and toboggans. While those with money joined the Snowshoe and Toboggan Club, others made do with the local hills .they careened wildly down streets and on the sidewalks. Favoured streets included Eramosa, Dublin and Cork.

The Working Class In Winter

Hockey – No One Was Fatally Injured

Bonnie Durtnall 0 1608 Article rating: No rating

Whereas Curling was a "gentleman's" game, Hockey was not. It was a rough and tumble sport in which factory and retail workers played against each other in an industrial or city league. Regional or national championships were not common but, in 1933, the Lancashire Felt hockey team became GCHA Champions.

The Working Class In Winter

Curling and Pleasure Skating

Bonnie Durtnall 0 1594 Article rating: No rating

Winter was a time for lower wages. It was also a time for taking to the ice.  The higher classes formed clubs with uniforms and events during the working day or later at night. The working classes had early evening games and played in City or Industrial Leagues.

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The Guelph Soap Company: Over A Hundred Years Of Production

In early Guelph, as with most pioneer communities, soap tended to be made at home. However, for many women who were brought up to believe a lady’s hands should be soft, home made soap was not desirable. Bought soap – particularly imported French soaps, were the answer.  With more goods available and an increasingly urban society, store-bought soaps (among other items) became increasingly common. The entire supply chain was shortened even further when a Guelph manufactory  the Guelph Soap Company or Guelph Soap Works began to produce soap.

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For The Love Of Cars: Guelph's Automotive Industry

In the 19th century, Canada began to produce automobiles. The first Canadian-made vehicle was steam-propelled. This was the famous Taylor Steam Buggy built by Henry Seth Taylor in Stanstead Quebec. It was seen crashing around the Eastern Townships in 1867, clearly marking Canadian confederation. And crashing is the right word. The car suffered from a problem. Taylor had failed to include brakes in his design.

Guelph flirted with car production with the Gilson and Jules 30. The manufacturers were more serious and showed greater longevity when it came to tire production and the manufacturing of automotive components.

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Vulcanization: Guelph's Tire Manufacturers

Guelph was quick to embrace the automotive craze of the early 20th century. Although it never did manage to produce automobiles, it did more than satisfactory in manufacturing a variety of car components – a trend that continues today. However, in the early 19th century, where it increased factory size and employment was in the production of tires. Several tire companies were created to meet the needs of the  growing automotive industry. Interestingly enough all set up their shop in the same structure on Metcalfe (Huron) Street.
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