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I Want to Ride My Bicycle: The History of Bicycles in 19th and Early 20th century Guelph

Bonnie Durtnall 0 66 Article rating: No rating

The late 1800s saw the emergence of a bicycle craze across Canada. The invention of the "Safety Bike" was partially responsible for the renewed popularity in this form of transportation. Guelphites became a part of this fad. The Middle and Upper classes established a cycling club. Small shops and individuals manufactured bicycles and made repairs. Bike gear was available for men and women - the latter taking to this new mode of transportation with a passion.. 

The Pipe Mill in the Ward: The Page-Hersey Tube Company

Bonnie Durtnall 0 131 Article rating: No rating

In 1889, an American, Randolph Hersey (1829-1918) founded Page & Hersey Company in Montreal in partnership with E. N. and G. H. Page. It operated out of a then idle tube mill owned by J. C. Hodgson. Located along the Lachine Canal, under Hersey, the tube mill began to prosper. Then Hodgson threw a wrench into the system. When the lease ended, he sold the property to the Montreal Rolling Mills. Hersey and his partners responded by deciding to move the plant halfway across the country to Guelph, Ontario. It was to remain in operation there for close to 50 years.

Libby, McNeill and Libby: Guelph's Other Pickle Factory

Bonnie Durtnall 0 151 Article rating: No rating

When people in Guelph talk about the “Pickle Factory,” they are referring to the Matthews-Wells factory - once located at Victoria and York. It opened in 1938 and closed in 1968. This was where many young men and women had their first job – often as summer employment.

However, Matthews-Wells was not Guelph’s first “pickle factory. Over two decades before, in 1914, Libby, McNeill and Libby founded in Chicago by Archibald McNeill, Arthur Libby and his brother Charles in 1868 made Guelph its Canadian headquarters.

Rowen-Ogg: Guelph's Last Shoe Manufacturers

Bonnie Durtnall 0 132 Article rating: No rating

The Rowen family was well known in Guelph for their boot and shoe store on Wyndham Street. Daniel R. Rowen (1847-1927) operated his shop at 16/18 Wyndham during the late 19th century. Lorando (Orlando) Ely Rowan (1875-1920), took over the shop from 1908-to 1909. It was in the following year that L.E. decided to go one step further and manufacture women’s, girls and children’s shoes. He joined in partnership with  experienced American shoemakers, James (John) Ogg, John J. Doherty and Thomas Dowdell to form Rowen-Ogg.

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I Want to Ride My Bicycle: The History of Bicycles in 19th and Early 20th century Guelph

The late 1800s saw the emergence of a bicycle craze across Canada. The invention of the "Safety Bike" was partially responsible for the renewed popularity in this form of transportation. Guelphites became a part of this fad. The Middle and Upper classes established a cycling club. Small shops and individuals manufactured bicycles and made repairs. Bike gear was available for men and women - the latter taking to this new mode of transportation with a passion.. 

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The Guelph Carriage Top Company: 1879 to 1923

At the corner of Dublin and Norfolk, once stood the Guelph Carriage Top Company. Also known as the Guelph Buggy Top Factory it managed to transition from buggies to automobiles. with a small workforce, including a woman mechanic during its early years, to produced quality products shipped nationally and even globally. 

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